MTU Main­tenance Hannover supports young re­search­ers

As a partner company in Jugend forscht, MTU Main­tenance Hannover helps coor­dinate the 2019 regional stage of the contest for young researchers. The winners earned them­selves prizes and big round of applause.

03.2019 | Text: Nicole Geffert

Text:
Nicole Geffert has been working as a free­lance journalist covering topics such as re­search and science, money and taxes, and education and careers since 1999.

Expertise

Ju­gend forscht is Ger­many’s most pop­u­lar young tal­ent com­pe­ti­tion. True to form, the pro­jects sub­mit­ted by this year’s con­tes­tants did not fail to amaze the ju­ry. For the fourth con­sec­u­tive year now, MTU Main­te­nance Han­nover is sup­port­ing the Ju­gend forscht ini­tia­tive through its in­volve­ment as a part­ner in the re­gion­al con­test. Oth­er lo­cal part­ners in­clude Leib­niz Uni­ver­si­ty Han­nover and Han­nover’s busi­ness de­vel­op­ment and em­ploy­ment de­part­ment.

“We want to get young peo­ple in­ter­est­ed in STEM sub­jects—sci­ence, tech­nol­o­gy, en­gi­neer­ing and math—and iden­ti­fy, en­cour­age and sup­port tal­ent­ed achiev­ers in these ar­eas,” says Alexan­dra Gehring, who co­or­di­nates Ju­gend forscht ac­tiv­i­ties at MTU Main­te­nance Han­nover. “MTU sees sup­port­ing the next gen­er­a­tion of sci­en­tists and re­searchers as its re­spon­si­bil­i­ty to so­ci­ety.”

Ac­cord­ing to Ju­gend forscht, nine out of ten suc­cess­ful par­tic­i­pants go on to pur­sue a STEM or med­ical sub­ject at uni­ver­si­ty. Fol­low­ing their stud­ies, about one half of the na­tion­al win­ners end up work­ing in re­search and de­vel­op­ment at uni­ver­si­ties, non-uni­ver­si­ty re­search in­sti­tu­tions or com­pa­nies.

Chiara Fienga spoke to represen­tatives from busi­ness and govern­ment about efforts to rid the oceans of microplastics. Hover over the image for a bigger view

Chiara Fienga spoke to represen­tatives from busi­ness and govern­ment about efforts to rid the oceans of microplastics.

aeroreport_jugend-forscht_1

Chiara Fienga spoke to represen­tatives from busi­ness and govern­ment about efforts to rid the oceans of microplastics.

One hundred and one pupils presented their projects in the atrium at Leibniz University Hannover. Hover over the image for a bigger view

One hundred and one pupils presented their projects in the atrium at Leibniz University Hannover.

aeroreport_jugend-forscht_2

One hundred and one pupils presented their projects in the atrium at Leibniz University Hannover.

In their sup­port­ing ca­pac­i­ty as part­ners, MTU and its re­gion­al coun­ter­parts as­sume full re­spon­si­bil­i­ty for run­ning and fi­nanc­ing their lo­cal com­pe­ti­tion. They pro­vide venues and dis­play stands, arrange food and ac­com­mo­da­tion for the par­tic­i­pants and ju­ry, and or­ga­nize the award cer­e­mo­ny and ac­com­pa­ny­ing pro­gram of ac­tiv­i­ties.

“We in­vit­ed the young re­searchers to take a tour of our fa­cil­i­ties to give them a glimpse be­hind the scenes,” Gehring says, the idea be­ing to spark an in­ter­est in air­craft en­gines among at least some of the young­sters. In the run-up to the event, school class­es from the re­gion were al­so in­vit­ed to Leib­niz Uni­ver­si­ty to see the 57 lo­cal pro­ject en­tries on dis­play in the atri­um build­ing. There was a prize draw of­fer­ing free trav­el and tours.

Ju­gend forscht re­mains as pop­u­lar as ever. Some 12,150 young­sters from all over Ger­many reg­is­tered for the 54th round of the com­pe­ti­tion, in­clud­ing 4,690 young women—rep­re­sent­ing a share of 38.6 per­cent. These fig­ures mark the third high­est num­ber of reg­is­tra­tions since Hen­ri Nan­nen—for­mer ed­i­tor in chief of Ger­man news mag­a­zine Stern—launched the com­pe­ti­tion back in 1965. In 1966, the first na­tion­al cham­pi­on im­pressed the ju­ry with an elec­tron­ic com­pu­ta­tion de­vice; al­most 50 years lat­er, the na­tion­al win­ners were two young tal­ents who built their own 3D ro­ta­tion print­er.

From left: Pauline Wünsch & Charlotte Wöbbecke; Marie Francksen & Nele Ransiek; Bennett Stalp, Adina Wendt, Chiara Beer & Tabea Sophie Karow & Jessica Belana Schneider (absent), Frederike Moek

Par­tic­i­pants are free to choose their re­search sub­jects them­selves, but their pro­jects must fall un­der one of sev­en key ar­eas: work en­vi­ron­ment, bi­ol­o­gy, chem­istry, geo- and space sci­ences, math­e­mat­ic­s/IT, physics and tech­nol­o­gy. The win­ners of the re­gion­al con­tests go on to com­pete at state lev­el. Those who come out on top of the state heats then qual­i­fy for the na­tion­al con­test, which this year takes place in Chem­nitz, May 16-19.

And who knows; maybe this year one of the win­ners from the Han­nover re­gion will make it through to the fi­nal. The lo­cal award cer­e­mo­ny took place at Leib­niz Uni­ver­si­ty on Feb­ru­ary 28, where the win­ning young re­searchers ac­cept­ed their awards to the ap­plause of around 400 guests, in­clud­ing rep­re­sen­ta­tives from gov­ern­ment and busi­ness. And the win­ners are: Ben­nett Stalp (Leib­nizschule, Han­nover), with a mo­bile above-ground ir­ri­ga­tion sys­tem; and Char­lotte Wöbbecke (Erich-Käst­ner-Gym­na­si­um, Laatzen) and Pauline Wün­sch (St.-Ur­su­la-Schule, Han­nover), with a study on the health of city trees in Laatzen.

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